Craft
Methods to Transform a Wardrobe from Routine to Revamped

Methods to Transform a Wardrobe from Routine to Revamped

Angela contacted me saying she loved the post I did about up-cycling a dress to a skirt and that she had some more ideas for up-cycling clothes. Here they are…

The change from summer to autumn means transitioning your wardrobe from the bright and fresh dresses to the warm and sophisticated fall garments. I was inspired to write this post after reading Nicole’s Dress to Skirt Up-Cycle because there are a lot of ways to make tired clothes feel new again, which is great for us recovering shopaholics out there. I’ll let you in on three of my apparel polishing tricks from splattering paint to repurposing shirts.

Use fabric paint on lackluster dresses, shirts or handbags.

You can use fabric paint on anything fabric, so go crazy with it. Use a paintbrush, spray bottle, or even a stamp to turn solid boring pieces into bold artistic designs. Splatters of purple, cobalt blue, and emerald green would be perfect for fall. You can achieve different looks depending on how you apply it. Use a bigger paint brush to paint some larger areas randomly throughout the dress. I like to do this on both sides (letting each side dry) on top of cardboard, outside on the ground. Then you can add a few small splatters using a small circular flinging motion with your smaller brush or use a spray bottle for a mor misted look. You might even want to add some shapes with a homemade potato stamp if you are feeling really crafty.

Get inspired by these dresses from Dolce & Gabbana

dolce and gabbana paint splatter dresses

Change the hem of your dresses or skirts.

After gaining a little bit of weight over the last year, I realised my fall sweater dresses don’t fit the way they used to. Now almost too short to wear with leggings, I decided to add a thick ribbon to the hem to add a couple of inches of length. Check out the variety of wholesale hair loss ribbon by visiting HairBowCenter.com and choose the right style to match your dress, skirt or shirt.

Skirt Ribbon

© Oliver and S

Turn your garment inside out and align the top of the ribbon with the bottom of the skirt using pins. You can measure how much you will need as you pin it, and cut the ribbon generously so you have a bit of room to work with. You can take your time to hand stitch it, or use a sewing machine. Make sure that you double stitch every couple of stitches so that it stays put through the wear and tear. Stitch the ribbon ends together once you make it all the way around your skirt, and you are done!

 

Repurpose all those worn in shirts.

Those soft, worn out shirts that have been taking up space in your closet can be easily made into a creative scarf. Just use two of different colors or patterns and place them on a hard surface. Cut the shirts lengthwise into long strips about 1 ½ inches wide (different lengths are fine).  Cut off the sleeves and set them aside for the last step.

T-Shirt Scarf

© Ninth & Bird

Pull on the strips so that they roll in on themselves like t-shirt fabric tends to do. Next, twist or braid some pieces together, maybe string a few beads on too and tie the ends in knots. Take the sleeve fabric and sew it around the knots for a polished look.

 

Thanks for those ideas! This is a bit about the author…

Angela Johnson is a 28 year old superwoman who loves sewing and playing Barbies with her four year old daughter. She also spends a lot of time tending to her huge organic garden, and walking her dog.

 

Nicole @ beaufrog

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Hemlock Tee from Grainline Studio

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I made an Archer Shirt

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Fabric Dash Around London

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Beaufrog | Making great fashion and beautiful homes
Dressmaking, Featured

This week I decided to give the Hemlock Tee a go from Grainline . I wanted something easy, comfortable and wearable to get me through January. And this one meant I could switch the colour of my threads out on my over locker (excited by the small things).

I already had a striped knit set to the side that worked brilliantly. I whizzed through the pattern like a breeze – only complication was that I have octopus arms and the sleeves were a weird length on me. So I kinda created 2 cuffs and overlocked those to the end of the sleeves – almost perfect :)

Hemlock tee

I did find with this knit that it had a lot of give in it and became huge around the waist, so after these pictures I ran it through the overlocker again taking off 4-5cm from the sides. It now sits really nicely on the hips while staying loose and slouchy around the neck.

Hemlock tee

Hemlock tee

It took 2 evenings to prepare the pattern and throw it together – so quick that I’ve got my sister making one too. Before hand she said she was scared of sewing machines….few hours later she’s flown through it! :)

If she’ll let me, pictures will be shared when finished.

Fabric shopping

I decided to go and explore Minerva Crafts a couple of weeks ago to get some air. It was that period between Christmas and New Year when you realise you can’t remember the last time you left the house – so I needed to do something that would make me feel sane again.

It’s only 30 minutes down the road and don’t know why I’ve never made the journey before…maybe because I think of Minerva as being online rather than bricks and mortar.

Anyway, after driving around a few one way streets and then eventually releasing “it’s that massive building there (!)” I entered into the shop to find a cave of goods.

Minerva-edging

The shop was very well stocked with crafting supplies – if you’re after wool then you’ll find it here!

As a fabric shopper, I think most of the stock sold online wasn’t on display in the shop but I did manage to find a couple of fabrics I might antibiotics return for.

I recognised this one which looks very similar to a version Paunnet used for a dress.

Minerva-measuring-tape-fabric

I also found a nice wool that I may be returning for which seemed like a bargain at £6.99 p/m. I’m looking to make a winter boyfriend style coat soon so this would work well.

Minerva-wool

I wasn’t expecting to, but I somehow ended up leaving with some knitting supplies to mess about with.

Before now I’ve tried cutting t-shirt jersey into thin strips to knit with, but failed – and got covered in frayed ends at the same time. Well, now they’ve only started selling the stuff!? It’s called Hoooked. So looking forward to experimenting with that along with some nice warm coloured wool to play with.

wool

So that’s it, there’s a lot of talk about Minerva online and I thought it would be nice to share what the store looks like…

Mirror

Nicole @ beaufrog

Dressmaking, Featured

Archer shirt

I’ve seen the pattern all over the web and thought it was time to have a go. I’ve never done a sew along before (I’ve always done my own thing) but decided to join in with the step by step walk though. And loved it :)

I didn’t realise it when I bought it at Christmas – but December was also Archer appreciation month! Good timing eh.

The fabric that I bought from Morocco seemed perfect. Maybe a bit soft but I bought it with a blouse/shirt in mind and there were no fabric shops open on boxing day to be distracted by!

Its been a while since I’ve sewn anything like this so I started with a toile first just to get familiar and gage the size as I could see myself making more than one of these shirts. It was good job because even after measuring the inside arm before hand, the sleeves ended being a good couple of inches too short.

Archer shirt - cutting table

The thickness of the muslin meant it was really easy to throw the shirt together. The edges met nicely, corners turned perfectly, and the pressure was non existent as this was a practise run.

For the second attempt I added an inch to the length of the body and 3 inches to the length of my arms. I have freaky arms.

Archer shirt - Rotary cutter

The cotton was a slightly different story. Just getting the grain nice and straight was the first problem as it distorted really easily. The next issue was pulling the grain when using scissors, so I had to give up on that tramadol idea and got out the rotary cutter.

Top tip : stick a bit of masking tape to the wrong sides of your pieces

Archer shirt - wrong side

My right sides had a slight sheen but it wasn’t always easy to identify. I stuck some washi tape to all my wrong sides and that saved loads of time – just remember to remove it before you trap it inside your yolk!

The cotton was very fragile so I had to be careful applying heat/steam. Where possible I used a second off cut of the fabric as a barrier for the heat but the iron allowed me to mould my pieces really nicely for a clean finish.

Had a couple of issues with the collar which I’ll avoid next time but was very pleased with my sleeve plankets this time. Jen eased the nerves in the sew-along.

Archer shirt - sleeve planket

The pockets where the last additions. In the Archer walk through, Jen put the pockets on at the start, but I decided to see what the shirt looked like without first. Hmm plain….

So I decided these needed so be featured up a bit. I’ve really enjoyed the top stitching on this project so I went for couple more diagonal lines on the pockets - just ’cause I could.

Archer shirt Archer shirt Archer shirt

So that’s it – my first Archer. I’m sure there will be more. Very little amendment needed, really clear instructions and nice looking result. You can buy the download from the Grainline shop.

Now I’m off to look at everyone else’s on flickr….

Nicole @ beaufrog

 

Update

Ta da, here it is…the new blog design!

Weve gone from this bland old thing -

Old beaufrog design

To this -

New-design-desktop

It seemed to take for ever for the name servers to move, and then there was some frantic find and replace action to get everything working again but Beaufrog has a fresh pharmacy face for 2014.

Its nice and easy to read across devices and Ill be sorting out the categorisation of posts to make it super easy to find the stuff that you are most interested in.

New-design-mobile

Hope you like it :)

nicole @ beaufrog

Pinterest

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- Please recheck your ID.

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Featured Posts

Hemlock Tee from Grainline Studio

Hemlock Tee from Grainline Studio

I made an Archer Shirt

I made an Archer Shirt

Fabric Dash Around London

Fabric Dash Around London

Dress to Skirt Up-Cycle

Dress to Skirt Up-Cycle

Make A Pleating Board

Make A Pleating Board

Categories

Search

Translation


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